As one in three employers struggle to fill technical vacancies due to skills shortages, and nearly 50% of graduates don’t go onto graduate roles, Charlotte Alldritt asks, have we reached peak university? The UK’s ‘productivity puzzle’ continues to fox academics. Despite some promising data in recent months, we’ve experienced a lost decade of productivity growth, stagnant living standards and persistent regional imbalances in our economy that entrench inequality and deprivation. Lack of skills is a large part of the problem. Since the late 1990s successive governments have placed higher education at the centre of efforts to increase productivity and global competitiveness. Today, nearly half of young people go onto university – just shy of the New Labour government’s 50% target. But nearly half again (49%) of graduates do not go on to graduate jobs within five years. Analysis by the Centre for Progressive Policy, a new think tank, finds that … (To read the full article, subscribe below)

Charlotte Alldritt is director of the Centre for Progressive Policy