Published: 1st Oct 2019

The ‘Ten Streets’ regeneration project is transforming a large part of Liverpool’s dockland into a new creative quarter. Urban specialist Kenn Taylor looks at how to learn from lessons in the city’s past and to ensure the scheme delivers a real and long-lasting creative district for Liverpool.

Photo Credit – Kenn Taylor

Liverpool’s Stanley Dock Tobacco Warehouse is the largest brick-built warehouse in the world and looms over all it surrounds.

It’s now also at the centre of change in a largely post-industrial area north of the city centre. I’ve known this area since going as child to the now-defunct market once held in the Stanley warehouse.

While the much of the area was falling into decay, I’d be reminded by my dad who’d worked nearby, that this had once been a thriving hub of industry, how tragic it’s decline was and how that had negatively impacted on so many people.

Merseyside had so much dereliction when I was a child, I’ve never seen urban decay as particularly romantic, or interesting, but shit. Something that needed to be changed. Yes, to preserve history, but also to create an economic engine for people in the area again.

Now plans for the nearby area include a new Everton FC stadium (the fifth such plan in my lifetime, but I remain an optimist – you have to be as an Evertonian) new port terminals bringing parts of the docks back to life, a slow-to-progress ‘Docklands-lite’ plan called Liverpool Waters, with the usual flats and offices, as well as the further redevelopment of the now partially refurbished Stanley Dock, described as ‘the biggest adaptive re-use challenge in Europe’ in a Heritage England article.

Perhaps the most interesting change though has been in the streets between Stanley Dock and the city centre. The cheap land, large ex-industrial spaces, as well as further development of the city centre, has attracted several arts and music spaces including Make Liverpool, Invisible Wind Factory, Drop the Dumbulls and more.

Ten Streets

The City Council has subsequently developed a Single Regeneration Framework for this area, named Ten Streets because, well, it’s ten streets from Saltney Street to Oil Street. The SRF envisages the further development of this area as a creative district.

The involvement of the local authority and external planning consultants has provoked understandable scepticism in some quarters and the usual cries of gentrification.

However, the situation with Ten Streets deserves unpicking further. While there have been some negative impacts of gentrification in Merseyside, the area faces far more fundamental challenges than that.

While it has come a long way, the economy remains weak and with the resulting lack of decent jobs, young local people often still leave for better opportunities, and experienced locals often face long commutes.

It also means the local tax base is low, reducing the city’s ability to pay for services for the needy and develop its economy and infrastructure.

It’s a vicious cycle, and one that makes issues around urban change in Liverpool and other under-invested cities like it, distinct from that in the overheated global metropolises like London and New York which dominate urban discourse, who face the inverse issue of too many jobs and not enough affordable space.

So how to create quality jobs, that local people can access, develop a more sustainable economy and also save historic buildings decaying through lack of demand and funds, are a troika of huge issues for Merseyside. Jobs in creative fields could form part of a solution.

Yet the potential for developing creative jobs in the area has been undermined in the past by low-grade property speculators driving creative organisations out of buildings, hence why many moved out to this north docks area.

Aggressive speculation

Baltic Triangle. Photo Credit – Kenn Taylor

Most notably this has been seen in the Baltic Triangle which I wrote about here, where the promising development of studio spaces by a CIC and a subsequent growth in venues et al is threatened by aggressive speculative residential development.

Some of what drove this plan for the Ten Streets is trying to stop that happening again.

As Claire Parry, Liverpool City Council’s planning lead on Ten Streets, details: ‘One of the things we’ve learnt from with Baltic Triangle is that didn’t benefit from an SRF. While it’s got a mixed land used designation, the feel with that is that it has become very residential dominated. What we have tried to do with Ten Streets is retain the employment focused designation to try and retain the job creating focus of the project.’

This SRF should help prevent speculation in the area, by controlling building heights, building styles, use designation etc.

Having heard similar sentiments before, I ask Claire to state in black and white, if a speculator buys a load of old buildings in this area and wants to kick a creative occupier or traditional industrial business out for flats, they’re now going to come up against this framework? ‘Precisely that,’ she says.

Parry thinks though for it to be successful as a creative area, a delicate balance is required between the Council protecting the area from speculation and being too heavy handed: ‘It’s a difficult thing we have to balance.

‘If there was one of these documents in place for Baltic it might have actually helped, but it seems though if the Council steps in it all becomes very kind of clinical and the organic nature is lost. What the hope is with this is we can have the best of both worlds, it’s not too prescriptive, things can just happen, but within the parameters set in the document.’

A big fat lease

Photo Credit – Kev Crooks

Liam Kelly, director of Make Liverpool, set up in the area because they a wanted long term base: ‘We wanted a big fat lease where we could put down roots and make it sustainable. We didn’t want to repeat the same old, same old temporary use of space with no exit plan, eventually get gentrified out, wash, rinse and repeat.’

Kelly feels they have been brought on board with the Ten Streets plan: ‘There was no consultation pre giving it a name and an identity and all that sort of stuff. But then they obviously consulted on the SRF, that then came out. Then they set up a steering group to which we were invited to and we host in our building.’

This is echoed by Liam Naughton from Invisible Wind Factory. He said: ‘They sort of said it’s all going to change, and they want to do this in the right way possible. A councillor was getting involved and they were like, “can you contribute to the aspects you care about in this area and inform this masterplan document, the SRF?”.’

Crucially Naughton feels that they have had impact in the process too: ‘I believe we have had a good influence on it. What’s added to it is they want to keep the creative industries at its core.’

Yet this positive vision could yet go unfulfilled. Liam Kelly feels the biggest threat to the Ten Streets idea is from speculators: ‘Concerns are really obvious,’ he says. ‘Spiralling uncontrolled rising rents and property values before anything has actually happened.

He continues: ‘It’s all pretty complicated stuff and the Council doesn’t really have the power that people expect it to. So, unscrupulous people who want to cash in are the biggest threat.’

Naughton feels if Ten Streets is given the opportunity to fulfil its potential, it could be powerful and have UK wide impact in terms of how such areas are developed: ‘I would love it if just doubled down on being an exciting place for culture and arts.

‘If there’s opportunities, there we’ll fill them in this city. We could do something interesting here. Grabbing those challenges, we’re seeing in the arts right now. You could be ambitious with it.’

Power imbalances

However, power imbalances remain, albeit with perhaps with a wider circle of involvement than most urban development plans, as Naughton details:
‘The big players are quite clear, it’s the City Council, with Harcourt the main developer and then Peel [developer] as an important thing to factor in as they’re right next to each other.

‘So really, they’re the major voices in the room as they’re the ones who can make the big decisions.

‘That said, I’m not cynical. They have listened to us. [Cllr] Ann O’Byrne Chairs a meeting we get invited to which is about having our say on certain things.

‘It’s an Advisory Group, so they don’t have to do it. But there are so many important voices in the room, if you suggest something that makes sense, it will get explored on some level.’

The focus of the discussion and plans for Ten Streets have been the former warehouses and factories adjacent to the docks.

While some people do live in the immediate vicinity, it’s always been principally industrial. Not far away though are residential districts that once relied on this area for their economic life. Vauxhall, Everton and Kirkdale are amongst the most historic areas of Liverpool and some of the most deprived parts of the UK.

Community news

Joel Hansen. Photo Credit – Kev Crooks

Joel Hansen runs Scottie Press, a community newspaper which has long given a voice to the area. Joel too wants to see the decay in this industrial area reversed: ‘I’d like to see Stanley Dock and the Ten Streets put Liverpool on the map again. It would be fantastic to see a resurgence in those streets. I’d like to see all them abandoned warehouses flourish again.’

Crucially though for Joel, this must involve creating opportunities for people living nearby: ‘Where they talk about a collaborative approach and celebrating heritage, does that count Vauxhall and Kirkdale, or is that for the artists who are living around there? I think there could be more effort to include the further community.’

He feels Ten Streets linking to its neighbouring districts will be vital to make it a sustainable success: ‘I think there needs to be something that’s going to integrate this changing time and hopefully educate people on what’s going to happen in Ten Streets.

If there are these companies moving in, are community centres, training providers and schools putting the effort in to prepare the younger generation to get these jobs? There needs to be a lot more awareness.’

There’s a real opportunity with this plan for Ten Streets to do something different in terms of creating much-needed jobs, protecting space for arts and culture and restoring important historic buildings, if managed carefully. Yet it could just as easily go the other way.

The City Council needs to show leadership by focusing on the good work that has already been done by small, tightly resourced, organisations, and ensure that developers can’t have things all their own way.

The creative sector itself meanwhile can no longer pretend does not have a role in gentrification and that naive ideas about ‘organic development’ only leave them open to being pushed out. All parties meanwhile need to ensure that this creative district offers opportunities to those living in residential areas nearby.

Steering development in the right direction

Invisible Wind Factory. Photo Credit – Kenn Taylor

For Ten Streets to work, it can’t just be done on trust, even if it does currently exist, relatively, between the different parties involved, as the power imbalances remain huge. The SRF will help, but more needs to be done.

Protected land ownership is the next step. If certain key streets or buildings could be passed to a Community Interest Company, as in Baltic Triangle, this would give a core base of locked in spaces for creative outfits.

Beyond this, a formally constituted board with equal voting rights for all members and actual clout on planning matters covering the area, could help formalise the relationship between the stakeholders, protect and steer development in the area in the right direction.

Such a model could see a CIC as a lead ‘developer’ in the area, generating rental income to keep sustaining and investing in more creative space. Yet at the same time leaving room for other initiatives to set up and operate in other buildings within a wider protective framework.

Combined with the SRF, these things could make Ten Streets a potential model for other places dealing with the now well-established cycle of post-industrial to creative. If successful, it could attract artists and creative outfits being displaced from elsewhere, helping the city develop.

Any CIC or formal board with power in the area should also have baked into its constitution that having representation from and creating opportunities for residents in north Liverpool was part of its remit.

Ten Streets marketing talks about Ten Big Ideas. Really, for this area to be successful and sustainable, it just needs one big idea to work.

That is to put formal structures and ownerships in place to give its mixed stakeholders a real say and control in how it develops. Ten Streets is just small enough to get some people with power and money to be bold and innovative, just big enough to test if it actually works.

To help create a real and long-lasting creative district and in turn encourage some more inclusive economic growth. Liam Naughton feels that the opportunity is there, if the positive ambitions of the project are maintained: ‘It’s going to be a challenging one to please everyone in the Ten Streets and we sort of think, if people just do a good job of it and keep it to the ambition we all said it was going to be a while ago, and not retreating on the big ideas.’

This is an abridged version of a longer piece you can read here

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