‘Good times’ urbanism has created misery for the many. It’s time for ‘social city’ urbanism, says Neil McInroy ‘The only thing that trickles downward is the lives of people, not the wealth’. So said Oriol Estela-Barnet, director of PEMB Barcelona, during a recent visit to Barcelona. His words reminded me of the work of the British geographer, David Harvey, who wrote in the Limits to Capital that ‘the accumulation of capital and misery go hand in hand, concentrated in space’. For thirty years, cities have ridden a wave of global economic buoyancy. This prompted a ‘good times’ urbanism which has worked for a few, but not the many. Inequality, poverty and misery are now on the rise in many cities around the world. We need a new urban response. We need to build a more social city. A new urban response I was invited to Barcelona by Oriol and PEMB, an organisation tasked with developing … (To read the full article, subscribe below)

Neil Mclnroy
Neil McInroy is chief executive of the Centre for Local Economic Strategies (CLES)