Prime minister David Cameron and chancellor George Osborne hosting a roundtable in Manchester last year on how to build a ‘northern powerhouse’. The current hyperbole associated with devolution in England intimates that enhanced territorial governance and localism is bound up with, and dependent on, fiscal decentralisation. The current emphasis on the ‘northern powerhouse’ and the entrepreneurial Devo-Manc would have us believe that a degree of locational independence will be the catalyst for economic resilience and the impetus for spatial rebalancing throughout England. It is hardly possible to pick up a government policy document or city future think piece, without some reference to more localised power and control of local finance. A research project that I am conducting with Paul Greenhalgh at Northumbria University offers a timely perspective in relation to fiscal decentralisation, in particular the potential impact of the government’s business rate retention strategy, which was introduced in … (To read the full article, subscribe below)

Kevin Muldoon-Smith
Kevin Muldoon-Smith is a lecturer in real estate economics and property development at the Department of Architecture and Built Environment at Northumbria University