In recent years there has been no shortage of reports about how bad austerity is and how it is affecting the poorest the most. However, while much of this is well meaning, it is short on what we need to do differently. In the new manifesto for local economies, the Centre for Local Economic Strategies (Cles) sets out ideas which breaks out of this austerity narrative and the present timidity of some proposed alternatives. For us, decent public services and fairness work with and for prosperity and against poverty and inequality. Cles draws on a range of experiences to reclaim a local economics which work for social justice. The problems we face are due to a local economic policy which is falling woefully short. Local economic thinking is following a well-trodden path – assuming that once investment capital is enticed and landed, wealth creation will flourish, the supply chain will … (To read the full article, subscribe below)

Neil Mclnroy
Neil McInroy is chief executive of the Centre for Local Economic Strategies (CLES)